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GLORIA PETYARRE, GRACIE MORTON PWERLE, VIOLET PETYARRE

$7,900.00

GLORIA PETYARRE, GRACIE MORTON PWERLE,
VIOLET PETYARRE
“Bush Medicine Leaves, Bush Seeds, Body Paint”
Acrylic on linen.
Painted in 2015.
Comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
Artwork is stretched and ready to hang.
110cm x 232cm

1 in stock

Description

GLORIA PETYARRE, GRACIE MORTON PWERLE,
VIOLET PETYARRE
“Bush Medicine Leaves, Bush Seeds, Body Paint”
Acrylic on linen.
Painted in 2015.
Comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
Artwork is stretched and ready to hang.
110cm x 232cm

 

ARTIST BIO

Gloria was born around 1945 in the remote artist community of Utopia, Northern Territory (250km north-east of Alice Springs).

Gloria sadly passed away in June 2021.

Gloria Petyarre is one of seven sisters who are well known Indigenous artists, including Kathleen Petyarre, Nancy Petyarre, Violet Petyarre and Ada Bird. She is also the niece of Emily Kame Kngwarreye.

Gloria won Australia’s longest running art prize, the Wynne Prize in 1999 with “Bush Medicine Leaves” being the first Indigenous person to win one of the Art Gallery of New South Wales’s major prizes. In 2009 Hermès commissioned Gloria to design one of its signature silk scarves. Based on Gloria Petyarre’s paintings.

Gloria’s beautiful “Bush Medicine Leaves” depicts the leaves of a particular type of shrub that has medicinal qualities. The women collect the leaves and boil it down to make a paste. The sacred plant is also used in women’s ceremonies and has a variety of practical uses.

Gloria paints her story in a range of different styles and types of brushes, including her signature ‘big brush’ style.

 

Gracie Morton Pwerle comes from a highly regarded family of contemporary Indigenous Artists in Utopia (approximately 250kms north-east of Alice Springs). Gracie’s mother is Myrtle Petyarre and her daughter is Cindy Morton Pwerle. Like many female artists of her era, Gracie began working on Batik in the early 1970’s before moving onto canvas in the early 1980’s.

Gracie’s paintings depict her Dreaming of “Bush Seeds” and “Bush Medicine Leaves”. In the Dreamtime, winds blew from all directions, carrying the bush seed across the ancestral lands. This is represented in her paintings through complex fine dot patterns to depict the contours and colours of the land and the walking tracks used by women to collect the bush seeds.

The Bush Medicine Leaves Gracie paints are a central focus of her Dreaming, as they serve as a fundamental source for medicinal and ceremonial purposes as they are believed to promote longevity.

Gracie is one of the senior traditional custodians for the Dreaming of the vast expanse of her country, some 263kms north of Alice Springs. In accordance to traditional law the responsibility for the “Bush Seed Dreaming” has been passed down to Gracie from her father and her aunt, who are responsible for ensuring that she perseveres its traditions.

Gracie is highly regarded for her beautiful intricacy seen predominately in her ‘Bush Seeds’ Dreaming which she combines perfectly with her expert use of colour. In Gracie’s ‘Bush Medicine Leaves’ Dreaming, gracie creates a unique and recognisable flow of movement, as she paints the medicine leaves as they float to the ground in the warmer months.