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MINNIE PWERLE, EMILY PWERLE, MOLLY PWERLE & GALYA PWERLE 

MINNIE PWERLE, EMILY PWERLE, MOLLY PWERLE & GALYA PWERLE
“Awelye Atnwengerrp”
Acrylic on linen.
Painted for DACOU Gallery in 2005.
Artwork is framed.
Comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
181cm x 122cm

POA

Description

MINNIE PWERLE, EMILY PWERLE, MOLLY PWERLE & GALYA PWERLE
“Awelye Atnwengerrp”
Acrylic on linen.
Painted for DACOU Gallery in 2005.
Artwork is framed.
Comes with Certificate of Authenticity.
181cm x 122cm

 

ARTIST BIO

Minnie Pwerle was born around 1910 and passed away 18 March 2006. She came from Utopia, Northern Territory, a cattle station in the Sandover area of Central Australia, 300 kilometres northeast of Alice Springs. Minnie is regarded as one of Australia’s leading contemporary Indigenous artists, alongside other notable Indigenous female painters Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Dorothy Napangardi, Gloria Petyarre and Kathleen Petyarre. Minnie began painting late in life at the age of 80, during the contemporary Indigenous Australian art movement, founded at Papunya Tula in the 1970’s-80’s. Minnie’s paintings quickly became popular and highly sought-after, with her very modern and minimalist style. Her paintings depict theme’s of Women’s ceremony, such as Body Paint or “Awelye Atnwengerrp”.

Minnie is the sister-in-law of the world famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye and mother of Barbara Weir, a very successful artist in her own right. She is also sister to the Pwerle Sisters; Emily Pwerle, Molly Pwerle and Galya Pwerle. Like her sisters, Minnie’s paintings depict traditional women’s ceremonies known as “Awelye Atnwengerrp”.

The bold expressive lines in her paintings represent body paint, dancing tracks in the sand and sacred places where the ceremonies take place.

 

Emily Pwerle was born in around 1922 in the remote Utopia station community (350km north east of Alice Springs). Utopia has a thriving artist community and is the birthplace of the celebrated Emily Kame Kngwarreye. Emily Pwerle is sister to the hugely successful Aboriginal artist Minnie Pwerle; also Molly Pwerle and Galya Pwerle – Together known as “The Pwerle Sisters”. Emily is also the aunt of acclaimed artist Barbara Weir (Minnie Pwerle’s daughter and grand daughter of Emily Kame Kngwarreye). Throughout 2004, Barbara Weir organised a workshop for the sisters, where they produced an amazing body of works. Occasionally they would collaborate on one artwork together.

Like her sisters, Emily’s paintings depict traditional women’s ceremonies known as “Awelye Atnwengerrp” which is broadly translated as women’s dreaming. Although all the sisters share the same Dreaming, each one has their own completely unique interpretation of the Dreaming. The bold expressive lines in Emily’s paintings are said to represent body paint designs, dancing tracks made in the sand during women’s ceremonies and sacred places where the ceremonies take place.

Emily’s paintings are held in collections and galleries around the world.

 

Galya is the youngest of the Pwerle sisters, born in around 1925 in the remote Utopia station community (350km north east of Alice Springs) Galya Pwerle is sister to Emily Pwerle, Molly Pwerle and the hugely successful Aboriginal artist Minnie Pwerle – Togther known as “The Pwerle Sisters”. Galya is also the aunt of acclaimed artist Barbara Weir (Minnie Pwerle’s daughter). Throughout 2004, Barbara Weir organised a workshop for the sisters, where they produced an amazing body of works. Occasionally they would collaborate on one artwork together. Like her sisters, Galya’s paintings depict traditional women’s ceremonies known as “Awelye Atnwengerrp” which is broadly translated as Women’s Dreaming. Although all the sisters share the same Dreaming, each one has their own completely unique interpretation of the Dreaming.

The bold expressive lines in Galya’s paintings are said to represent body paint designs, dancing tracks made in the sand during women’s ceremonies and sacred places where the ceremonies take place.

 

Molly Pwerle was born in around 1919 in the remote Utopia station community (350km north east of Alice Springs). Molly Pwerle is sister to Emily Pwerle, Galya Pwerle and the hugely successful Aboriginal artist Minnie Pwerle – Togther known as “The Pwerle Sisters”.

Molly is also the aunt of acclaimed artist Barbara Weir (Minnie Pwerle’s daughter). Throughout 2004, Barbara Weir organised a workshop for the sisters, where they produced an amazing body of works. Occasionally they would collaborate on one artwork together. In recent years, the sister’s have again started to paint collaborative works. Like her sisters, Molly’s paintings depict traditional women’s ceremonies known as “Awelye Atnwengerrp” which is broadly translated as “Women’s Dreaming”. Although all the sisters share the same Dreaming, each one has their own completely unique interpretation of the Dreaming.

The bold expressive lines in Molly’s paintings are said to represent body paint designs, dancing tracks made in the sand during women’s ceremonies and sacred places where the ceremonies take place.